Thankful-A Contest

Every year, we like to honor those that go above and behind for our children.  Maybe it’s your child’s soccer coach that understands what your child needs to be successful on the team.  It could also be a dance instructor, art teacher, the general education teacher, special education teacher, a Tae-Kwon-Do instructor, or an after school teacher.  Maybe it’s the principal at your child’s school that has shown empathy and understanding and helped created an accommodation for your child. The possibilities are limitless!

We would love to hear who has had a positive influence  in helping your child be successful! Please e-mail us your nomination(s) at confidentsolutions7@gmail.com no later than November 16th. Please include the name and the area in which he/she has positively influenced your child.

On Friday, November 17th, we will announce the winning professional and award them with a $50 Target gift card (just in time to use over Thanksgiving break ).   Every nomination will receive a handwritten, handmade card of gratitude.

Gratitude will bring more into our lives immediately.-Rhonda Byrne

With Appreciation,

Christina and Wendy

Advertisements

A New School Year

A new school year already! This can bring feelings of excitement as well as anxiety.  One thing you can to do prepare for the new school year is to begin communicating with your child’s teacher.  Who else knows him or her like you do? Communication is a critical piece in your partnership with your child’s school. We recommend writing an e-mail or a letter to your child’s new teacher telling them all about your child.  We previously wrote a post about this but feel it’s important to share again. You can find the past post here Communicating with Your Child’s Teacher which also includes a link for a template on how to write a letter and communicate.

As the year progresses, keep that communication line open.  Here is a  link to the Wrightslaw website on how to write an effective letter to your child’s school pertaining to any EC needs or concerns http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/letters.draft.htm

If you would like help on how to begin or tools for communicating with your child’s school, please reach out to us at confidentsolutions7@gmail.com.

Cheers to the start of a fantastic year!

With Appreciation,

Christina and Wendy

 

Free-back-to-school-clipart-the-cliparts.png

Communicating an “Invisible Disability”

We are aware of the challenges of communicating an “invisible disability” with a teacher, administrator and even a relative.  What do we mean by “invisible disability?”  This refers to a disability other people can not easily see, and often times, they will unknowingly bear judgment towards the parent and/or child.  The disability may be ADD/ADHD, anxiety, Asperger’s Syndrome, Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyscalculia, etc.  Unfortunately, we may hear teachers or relatives imply the child needs more discipline or will offer an opinion about how to parent.   Usually there’s a “therefore…” thought that follows. People who don’t deal with invisible disabilities on a daily basis often want the child to perform to their expectations. Their individual awareness of what the child struggles with becomes apparent. If you pull back and look at the situation, often these statements from other adults are coming from a place of their personal awareness, social expectations and individual experiences they have had in their lives.  Often, as adults, we struggle seeing beyond our own personal experiences.

So, how do we communicate with people who do not “see” the disability? This is especially important if they have an influence in the child’s life (such as a relative or teacher).

As a parent, you are in the role of helping your child succeed.  First, you are gaining information about your child and his or her disability.  As you work with other professionals, attend classes, and build your child’s team, you are creating a shift of awareness within yourself.  Understanding where your child’s strengths and weaknesses lie and setting goals to further help your child will create a shift within your family.

As awareness increases you will be setting up expectations and goals at home.  What do you expect as a parent?  How do you communicate and help your child with these expectations at home?  What are your expectations and goals for yourself? A plan will begin to form based on your new knowledge. Your parenting style may change.

Hold true to your plan even if a grandparent, aunt or uncle can not understand it.  Remember, they have awareness based on their experiences.  You may choose to give information to a family member along the way, but we recommend doing so with an open heart instead of a goal of creating a shift in them.

When working with teachers and school staff, understand two things: one, they are working with your child from their experiences and training, and two they may see your child in a different light. Difficulties you experience at home may not be the same as what they are experiencing  at school. Share your knowledge; but listen to theirs as well.  Share evaluations and your home experiences but also remember to be open to  hearing about situations from school.  You both may have different perspectives, but work towards coming together for the benefit of your child.

With your child’s teacher, come up with a plan for school.  Be specific in your expectations.  Are you hoping to have your child’s teacher gain more awareness of how your child thinks socially?  Or are you wanting them to help your child experience more academic success?  We have found that you will have more success  communicating with your child’s school when you have one or two specific goals in mind.

In closing, we are aware that “invisible disabilities” are very real.  They affect our children differently in different environments.  The level of impact one of these disabilities has on a child can be significant in all areas of their life.  Ultimately, you are creating a shift in thinking within yourself, creating goals and expectations for your family, bridging a gap with your child’s school, and holding true to your plan when around extended family.  Although these areas can be challenging, consistency with your overall plan will reap the greatest reward.

With Appreciation,

Christina and Wendy

 

And the Winner Is…

Thank you for all of your nominations letting us know how special and unique your child’s teacher is!  We have enjoyed reading them!

The winner of the $50.00 Target gift card is Jennifer Flowers with Cabarrus County Schools.  She is a first grade teacher who, according to her teacher nomination, has “demonstrated a positive, collaborative, supportive approach of care towards her student as well as the parents”.  We are thankful for teachers like Ms. Flowers who are willing to go that extra step helping a child succeed.

Every teacher that was nominated will receive a hand crafted card of thanks.

take-a-village

Wishing your families a Happy Thanksgiving holiday!

With Appreciation,

Christina and Wendy

Thanking a Teacher-Contest

Do you have a teacher that goes that extra mile for your child? One that has created a “shift” in thinking and has helped your child be successful?  Maybe it’s your child’s main teacher (general educator).  Maybe it’s your child’s special education teacher,  music teacher, art teacher, or PE teacher.

We would love to hear about your child’s teacher and the positive influence he/she has had in helping your child be successful!  Please e-mail us at confidentsolutions7@gmail.com and tell us about your unique teacher. Please include the name, area in which he/she is teaching and positively influencing your child,  and the school’s name with the address.  We will pick a winner and announce it on Thanksgiving Day!  

The winning teacher will receive a hand crafted card of gratitude with a $50 Target gift card letting them know how much they are appreciated! 

The contest ends next Wednesday, November 23rd.   The winning teacher will be announced on Thursday, November 24th.    We are excited to help recognize your child’s unique teacher!

take-a-village

With Appreciation,

Christina and Wendy